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Twitter Art Auction

2009/10/30

I saw the coolest thing on Twitter.  The twitter name is @140hours .  The website is http://www.140hours.com/ .  It’s a fine arts auction and it’s kind of like ebay.  Go to the site and check it out.   There are some really cool pieces, lots of different styles, mostly paintings.  I am really impressed, so glad I ran across this.  I hadn’t been on twitter for a week, by the way.  Also, if you do twitter and want to follow me I’m juliawb.  It is my most liberal social networking arena, so, just so you know!

I’ll link to some of the ones I liked.

http://www.140hours.com/paintings/pages/kristencarleton.htm – the colors are clear, beautiful and concise. 

http://www.140hours.com/paintings/pages/andreaphillips.htm – cool social commentary, picture tells a story, interpretation can vary

http://www.140hours.com/paintings/pages/jenniferrehnke.htm – beautiful abstract impressionist (I guess) miniature

http://www.140hours.com/paintings/pages/tiffanyjohnson.htm – lovely self study and I love the fullness of the form

http://www.140hours.com/paintings/pages/nancyeckels.htm – very nice abstract

http://www.140hours.com/photographs/pages/christynicholas.htm – This is one of my favorites.  It’s a photograph with a very interesting technique.  I love monoliths, and I dream to visit this sight in the Orkney Islands one day–same place where Skara Brae is!!

I love a lot of them.  Check it out!!

Skara Brae

2009/10/03

One day I would love to see Skara Brae in Northern Scotland. There are these incredible stone structures built underground by very skilled, intelligent stone age folks. I’ve only seen pictures, but the dwellings have a place for a fire, benches, things one would see in a simple home, all made of stone. They are beautiful in their precision. It’s by the sea. Think what beautiful man made stone structures could be in the sea now. Would they be intact? I’ll see if I can find a photo and post.

It was discovered about 1850, under grass & soil.  What makes it so unique is how well preserved the site was.  Here are some pics:  (note Neolithic, c. 3100-2500 BC)  The 1st is a map of how it would have looked during this period.  The 2nd is how is looks today. (just a part of it)